Welcoming New Donors

Welcoming New Donors

First donations are opportunity to cultivate a long-term relationship. While not all donors will contribute regularly, it is hard to know by a first contribution who will be there in the long run. Some small donors turn out to be your largest donors years later. No donor should be treated as an after-thought, regardless of how small their contribution. They could also potentially become great community allies or volunteers. Value varies, but all are important. So how can you nurture that new donor to put your best foot forward in fostering a long-term relationship? The first step is to send a welcome email series.

Fundraising and Donor Relationships

Fundraising and Donor Relationships

Today, we will discuss how all actions your nonprofit takes are interconnected. Every decision and action taken by all segments of your organization will impact every single one of your strategies, so the key focus today is on how to plan your strategies to ensure that they enhance the efforts of the other parts. If done correctly, better contributions, support, and functionality will be achieved.

Donor Stewardship

Donor Stewardship

Procuring new donors is painstaking work and takes many hours for all development professionals in the nonprofit world. Much like the sales process in for-profit industries, closing on first time gifts can require continuous follow-up, repeat efforts to secure a conversation to close the gift solicitation, while ensuring that the donor feels heard, respected, and valued for their contribution to your nonprofit’s efforts. Closing the gift is not the end.

Board Member Philanthropic Involvement

Board Member Philanthropic Involvement

It is essential that all members of the organization, including the board members, are actively engaged in all fundraising activities. To do so not only solidifies their purpose on the board, it also asserts their determination to see the nonprofit thrive. Disinterest relating to fundraising has to go beyond personal comfort and become something bigger than the individual. Charitable giving is currently rising above $400 billion in the United States. As thrilling as that may sound, it does not come by easily. Those dollars are in heavy competition with many others who feel that their organization deserves the funding more than yours. Personal donations, government grants, corporate gifts, private foundations, and other fundraising platforms are continuously expanding. Smaller nonprofits are not finding themselves on the positive end of the receiving stick.